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By Miao
Rank: Champion
#41349
Mercedes-Benz 190 E 2.5 - 16 Evolution II '91
Mercedes-Benz 190 E 2.5 - 16 Evolution II '91.jpg
In the early 1980s, Mercedes-Benz decided to return to racing after a long absence from motorsports. The car it developed was the 190E 2.3-16, a sporting model based on the company's 190 series.

The highlight of this car was its engine, based on a 2.3-liter SOHC inline-4 that Mercedes already had in production. A 16-valve DOHC head was developed and the engine was tuned by Cosworth; a race engine builder of note and famous for its Formula 1 power plants. The resulting engine boasted 182 HP and 167.0 ft-lb of torque.

The 190E 2.3-16 with the Cosworth-honed engine began racing in the Deutsche Tourenwagen Meisterschaft - better known around the world as DTM - in 1986. By 1988 the car had evolved into the 190E 2.5-16, giving it a larger displacement engine in the hopes of defeating BMW's M3. This 2.5-liter engine could now make it up to 197 HP. A DTM homologation model, known as the 190E 2.5-16 Evolution, entered limited production in 1989.

A year later, M-B released the ultimate 2.5-16: the 190E 2.5-16 Evolution II. On looks alone, the Evolution II looked like a potent machine. Large, bulging fenders added at all four corners to accommodate the wide 245/40ZR-17 tires, and the trunk now sported a giant wing so large it overhung the rear end. Only 500 of these 235-HP road cars were ever produced. And the car experienced much success in the DTM in 1992.

Specs:
Mercedes-Benz 190 E 2.5 - 16 Evolution II '91 specs.png
Mercedes-Benz 190 E 2.5 - 16 Evolution II '91 specs.png (6.05 KiB) Viewed 2643 times
Mercedes-Benz 190 E 2.5 - 16 Evolution II.jpg
Mercedes-Benz 190 E 2.5 - 16 Evolution II '91 rear.jpg
Mercedes-Benz 190 E 2.5 - 16 Evolution II '91 side.jpg
Mercedes-Benz 190 E 2.5 - 16 Evolution II 1991.jpg
Mercedes-Benz 190 E 2.5 - 16 Evolution II '91 interior.jpg
User avatar
By Miao
Rank: Champion
#41378
Alpine A220 '68
Alpine A220 '68.jpg
With financial backing from Renault, Alpine prototype racers recorded many class victories in the 24 Hours of Le Mans in the mid 1960s. These nimble racers were the result of the collaboration of Jean Redele's Alpine and Aimedee Gordini, who was responsible for the engines. They were especially successful in the Index of Performance, in which the most efficient racers fight for top honors.

A dramatic rule change at the end of the 1967 season brought Alpine closer to building a contender for the overall victory. From 1968 onwards, prototype racers' displacement was limited to three litres, which left the Ferraris and Fords obsolete. Gordini's largest engine used in the Le Mans racers was a 1.5 litre 'four'. By mounting two of those four cylinder blocks on a single crankcase, Gordini created a V8 engine displacing just under 3 litres.

The end result was a very conventional V8, with four chain driven overhead camshafts. The fuel / air mixture was initially fed through four Weber Carburetors, but later on a Fuel Injection system was also tested. Power for the 'carb' engine was quoted at 310 hp and the Fuel Injection model with a higher compression was said to be good for around 350 hp. The five speed gearbox was sourced from the German ZF company.

Alpine constructed a tubular spaceframe chassis for the V8 to be mounted in. Suspension was by wishbones all-round, with coil springs over dampers. Dubbed A220, the new car shared its body design with the smaller A210 model. The complete package was as good looking as the previous racers, but with the team venturing into a new class, would it be as successful?

The first A220 made its debut early in the 1968 season, but proved underpowered and unreliable. Four cars were entered at Le Mans, but only one managed to finish the race in eighth position in front of three A210s. None of the three cars entered in the 1969 race made it to the finish. The few A220 victories did score, were in a number of minor races in France.

Although the A220 design was further developed with a push-rod rear suspension, the sports car program was suspended at the end of 1969 as Alpine focussed on rallying. A new generation of V6-engined prototype racer emerged in 1973 and it would evolve into the 1978 Le Mans winning A442.

The first A220 made its debut early in the 1968 season, but proved underpowered and unreliable. Four cars were entered at Le Mans, but only one managed to finish the race in eight position in front of three A210s. None of the three cars entered in the 1969 race made it to the finish. The few A220 victories were scored in a number of minor races in France. Alpine had to wait another 10 years for the well deserved overall victory.

Specs:
Alpine A220 '68 specs.png
Alpine A220 '68 specs.png (5.91 KiB) Viewed 2520 times
Alpine A220.jpg
Alpine A220 '68 rear.jpg
Alpine A220 '68 side.jpg
Alpine A220 '68 interior.jpg
User avatar
By 死の (Shino)
Rank: Pit Crew
#41432
Spada Codatronca Monza '12
Spada Codatronca Monza '12.jpg
First shown at the 2012 Geneva Auto Show, the Codatronca Monza is the second supercar introduced by Spada Vetture Sport. The Codatronca Monza is essentially the convertible version of the Codatronca TS. Both cars use a modified chassis and engine from the Chevrolet Corvette C6, but featured all-new bodywork; The bodywork is made from carbon-fibre, whilst the aluminium chassis features a roll cage.

The Monza uses a supercharged version of the Codatronca TS' 7-litre V8, and produced 710 hp and 701 lb·ft (950 N·m) of torque. The Codatronca Monza also featured the Italian Air Force roundel on the sides of the vehicle. Spada Vetture Sport claimed that the car could accelerate from 0 to 100 km/h in three seconds, and reach a top speed of 335 km/h.

Specs:
Spada Codatronca Monza '12 specs.png
Spada Codatronca Monza '12 specs.png (8.87 KiB) Viewed 2238 times
Spada Codatronca Monza.jpg
Spada Codatronca Monza '12 rear.jpg
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Spada Codatronca Monza '12 interior.jpg
User avatar
By Miao
Rank: Champion
#41471
Daihatsu Midget II D-Type '98
Daihatsu Midget II D-Type '98.jpg
Inheriting the name "Midget" which had ceased production in 1971, was the Midget II. Though the original Midget took on a simple front wheel and double rear wheel tricycle design, the Midget II adopted a 4-wheel layout for safety. While a two-person model was added later, the base model was a one-seater, inheriting the motorcycle-like feel of the 1st generation model.

With a length of 109.8 inches and a width of 50.9 inches, it was 7 inches shorter than the last model of the first generation, while its width was the same. Minimum turning radius was an amazing 11.8 ft. While the maximum payload was quite small being only 150 kg, there was little complaint since it was only intended for light work such as neighborhood deliveries. With frog-like headlights and the front nose-mounted spare tire, its visual impact was excellent. It also saw much use as a mobile billboard.

The engine was a 659 cc straight-3 SOHC mounted under the driver's seat, and it was rear wheel drive. The suspension utilizes struts in the front and rigid leaf springs in the rear. At first, only a single-seat 4-speed manual transmission model was made available, but with the increase of private owners, a column shift 3-speed AT and 2-seater models were added. In 1997, a cargo-type model with a roof over the truck bed was also released.

In 1998, minor changes were made to conform to new codes and standards for lightweight cars. In order to clear the strict collision safety standards, the front grille was enlarged. This car had the minimum necessities crammed into a minimal body, but was designed with maximum personality.

Specs:
Daihatsu Midget II D-Type '98 specs.png
Daihatsu Midget II D-Type '98 specs.png (5.91 KiB) Viewed 1934 times
Daihatsu Midget II D-Type '98 rear.jpg
Daihatsu Midget II D-Type '98 side.jpg
Daihatsu Midget II D-Type '98 interior.jpg
User avatar
By Miao
Rank: Champion
#41491
Warachia wrote:Really?
Yep, really. What a better day than AprilFool's to publish one of the trollest cars to ever appear in a game on this list? Image

Image
User avatar
By MadManCK
Rank: Site Admin
#41497
Miao wrote:
Warachia wrote:Really?
Yep, really. What a better day than AprilFool's to publish one of the trollest cars to ever appear in a game on this list? Image
Lol :loll:
User avatar
By 死の (Shino)
Rank: Pit Crew
#41542
Audi RS6 Avant '08
Audi RS 6 Avant '08.jpg
The RS6 Avant announced at the 2007 Frankfurt Auto Show is an ultra high performance model based on the A6 Avant. It was developed by quattro, a child company of Audi AG. Most notable is of course the ultra high-spec power plant. The 5.2L V10 engine is fitted with a twin turbo, to produce a supercar-like output of 580 HP/479.5 lb-ft. Feeding this power through the 6 speed Tiptronic S and quattro system, it accelerates the 2155 kg body from a standstill to 100 km/h in just 4.6 seconds. Though a restrictor limits its top speed to 250 km/h, it would most likely exceed 300 km/h easily if unrestricted.

While given this amazing level of performance, it loses nothing from its character as a station wagon. The cargo room capacity is 565 l normally, and expands to 1660 l when the rear seats are folded. Differences in appearance from the A6 Avant are kept to a minimum. On the exterior, there are special emblems in the front and rear of the body, special rims and an exhaust tip. The interior's front seats are changed to a sports type and the decoration panel utilizes carbon parts. Once you're rolling in the world's fastest station wagon, the beast will blow away your average sports car on the road. It's virtually impossible to utilize 100% of this car's potential on public roads. The RS 6 Avant is much more than you can possibly ask for, combining sports car driving performance with the utility of a station wagon.

Specs:
Audi RS 6 Avant '08 specs.png
Audi RS 6 Avant '08 specs.png (7.22 KiB) Viewed 1560 times
Audi RS 6 Avant.jpg
Audi RS 6 Avant '08 rear.jpg
Audi RS 6 Avant '08 side.jpg
Audi RS 6 Avant '08 interior.jpg
User avatar
By 死の (Shino)
Rank: Pit Crew
#41571
Connaught Type-D GT Syracuse '06
Connaught Type-D GT Syracuse '06.jpg
Connaught Engineering, often referred to simply as Connaught, was a Formula One and sports car constructor from the United Kingdom. The name Connaught is a pun on Continental Autos, the garage in Send, Surrey, which specialised in sales and repair of European sports cars such as Bugatti, and where the cars were built. In 2004, the Connaught name was revived by Connaught Motor Company for their Type D Syracuse and Type D-H hybrid supercars.

The Type-D GT is a hand-crafted 2+2+ sports coupé, a tribute to the legacy of Connaught and it was built with production limited to 100 vehicles. Designed and built by Connaught, the supercharged 2.0 litre V10 engine delivers 300 hp, which provides the GT with a power-to-weight ratio of 315.79 hp per tonne. The Type-D is built on a lightweight, composite and stainless steel structure with aluminium body panels. The front-mid engine layout, light-weight technology and a low centre of gravity ensures a good weight distribution.

Specs:
Connaught Type-D GT Syracuse '06 specs.png
Connaught Type-D GT Syracuse '06 specs.png (6.84 KiB) Viewed 1370 times
Connaught Type-D GT Syracuse.jpg
Connaught Type-D GT Syracuse '06 rear.jpg
Connaught Type-D GT Syracuse '06 side.jpg
Connaught Type-D GT Syracuse '06 interior.jpg
User avatar
By Miao
Rank: Champion
#41626
Caterham Seven Fireblade '02
Caterham Seven Fireblade '02.jpg
Caterham is a British automobile manufacturer who produces the Super 7, a unique car which is an evolved version of the Lotus 7. Caterham already has 25 years of history producing their Super 7, and the current Super 7 is greatly evolved from the early models.

The Caterham Super 7 comes in a large variety of engines as did the original Lotus 7. However the most unique out of these, is probably this model that has been named the Fireblade.

If you are a motorcycle fan, it may bring to mind a Honda Superbike of the same name - and you are not mistaken. This Fireblade is powered by that very motorcycle engine.

The power plant of the Honda Fireblade from the late 1990's, was a 916cc inline 4 cylinder, with a maximum output of 138 HP. Though its power may not be very impressive, you must remember this is a motorcycle engine, which means that it is extremely light. The engine itself only weighs 66.5 kg.

As a result, the Caterham Fireblade powered by this engine only weighs a total of 369 kg. If you do the math, this is equal to 374 HP per ton, powerful enough to classify it as a monster machine. Not only this, the extremely light engine is mounted as close to the bulkhead as possible, for a front midship layout. The engine and layout gives the car extremely good power performance, and incredible handling to go with it.

This is a sports car that reminds drivers that the greatest strength of a sports car is light weight.

Specs:
Caterham Seven Fireblade '02 specs.png
Caterham Seven Fireblade '02 specs.png (5.94 KiB) Viewed 1171 times
Caterham Seven Fireblade.jpg
Caterham Seven Fireblade '02 rear1.jpg
Caterham Seven Fireblade '02 rear.jpg
Caterham Seven Fireblade '02 interior.jpg
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